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    Avast is being problematic

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    reddotdj
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    Age : 54
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    Avast is being problematic

    Post by reddotdj on Mon Nov 03, 2008 9:07 pm

    I have iit running as a screensaver and it keeps saying that there is a virus on G: W32 variant. All I want to know is... is there a definiteive way of trashing the System Volume Information folder.

    This is just used as storage but as it has music on it I would rather not just trash the whole HDD until I've backed it up.
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    Placehold
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    Age : 33
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    Computer Specs : Windows Vista home premium :: Intel(R) Core(TM) Duo CPU
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    Re: Avast is being problematic

    Post by Placehold on Mon Nov 03, 2008 9:23 pm

    Hello Smile

    There isn't a way as such which allows you to delete the System Volume Information folder completely however you can gain access to the folder and delete relevant content, After a reboot the folder then appears to be deleted


    XP Pro or XP Home Edition Using the FAT32 File System

    1. Click Start, and then click My Computer.

    2. On the Tools menu, click Folder Options.

    3. On the View tab, click Show hidden files and folders.

    4. Clear the Hide protected operating system files (Recommended) check box. Click Yes when you are prompted to confirm the change.

    5. Click OK.

    6. Double-click the System Volume Information folder in the root folder to open it.


    XP Pro Using the NTFS File System on a Domain

    1. Click Start, and then click My Computer.

    2. On the Tools menu, click Folder Options.

    3. On the View tab, click Show hidden files and folders.

    4. Clear the Hide protected operating system files (Recommended) check box. Click Yes when you are prompted to confirm the change.

    5. Click OK.

    6. Right-click the System Volume Information folder in the root folder, and then click Sharing and Security.

    7. Click the Security tab.

    8. Click Add, and then type the name of the user to whom you want to give access to the folder. Choose the account location if appropriate (either local or from the domain). Typically, this is the account with which you are logged on. Click OK, and then click OK again.

    9. Double-click the System Volume Information folder in the root folder to open it.


    Hopefully this may assist you further 😁

    Regards








    Craig


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